Raised Panel Doors

Raised panel doors are among the most popular kitchen cabinet and interior door designs that provide a unique appearance for various applications. These doors feature a modern and sleek look while having a classic vibe and attractive characteristics. The revolutionary design of raised panel doors combines two tiny wings that cut downward and two larger sections that shear upward for an ideal smooth cut in different types of wood, including hardwoods, plywood, MDF, and even softwoods. Manufacturers and carpenters aim to create the highest quality doors with the advanced tools available in the market.

Raised panel doors consist of a frame surrounding a particular panel, and it contains stiles and rails. Each product has two stiles and two rails to form the surrounding structure around the board. The rails are typically the horizontal sections of the design, while the door stiles are the vertical sections of the door. Manufacturer’s machine one edge of each stile and rail and create a groove to provide a holding section for the panel. Then they fabricate the ends of the door rails with a tongue to form a strong glue joint for the frame and fit it into the side of the product. Experts call the groove and profile a stick cut on the edge of the rails and stiles, and the tongue or counter profile is known as a cope cut among the carpenters. The length of the raised panel door stiles is often the same as the height of it, and experts determine it by subtracting the width of the stiles from the width of the product. Then they add the length of both of the tongues on the edges of the rails. This method is practical for creating both kitchen cabinet doors and interior doors.

Raised Panel Doors Glue Up Process

Creating and producing raised panel doors is a rewarding woodworking process. Manufacturers follow precise instructions and methods to develop these practical products with the best quality. After they make raised panel doors, an additional process is called gluing up the joints. When making larger and wider panel doors, experts should make a glue joint to provide superior fit and secure the door. They utilize a wide range of joint bits and glue joints to make stronger joints by developing a larger surface area for the substance. The joints help produce alignment for the workpieces and provide more glue surfaces for a robust and invisible attachment. The glue-up process features predefined and standard steps to follow. The following are the stages that every manufacturer or carpenter should follow to glue up the raised panels to create more oversized products.

Inserting the Glue Joint Bit into The Router Collet: The first step is to insert the glue joint on a table-mounted router and then unplug the router. It is essential to make sure the device’s collet is clean and in excellent working condition. Experts set the routing speed to the recommending setting for the cutter. Then they make sure that at least 80% of the router bit shank is inserted in the collet and tighten the bit securely in the holder.

Setting the Cutter Height and Making a Test Cut: This step starts with unplugging the router for the second time. The height of the cutter tool above the machine table must be equal to half the thickness of the workpiece. Carpenters can utilize a straight edge to set the router table infeed and outfeed fences to align with the minor cutting diameter of the bit. It is crucial to be sure of the free rotation of the bit and the contact-free of the router with any part before plugging the cutting machine. Then after hitting the device, cutting along the edges of a piece of sample material starts. Experts cut the sample piece in half and flip one of the sections for better precision. Then they again unplug the device for cutter height adjustment if necessary, for making the surface flush. If the flipped piece is higher than the face-up section, it is required to lower the bit, and for the lower part, the operator must raise the bit. After ensuring no contact between the router and the table or the fence, it is better to make another test cut.

Creating Glue Joint Edges: The glue edge creating step begins with labelling the best surface of each panel as “Face”. Manufacturers run one edge of the board with a side label Face up and then flip the board to run the opposite edge with the Facedown. The joint edges step must be repeated on all pieces except two of them to side up. Face run on one edge only. The last remaining part must be run with Face side down on another advantage.

Gluing and Clamping the Panel: The last step is to turn the pieces face side up, arranging them so that the mating edges are adjacent and the panel on each end features a flat edge. Then carpenters should apply glue to all edges and utilize plenty of clamps for securing the board until the bond is dried thoroughly. The final process is to remove the clamps, sand, or plane the panel flat and trim or smooth to finalize the demanding product’s size.

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